Categories
Food Japan

to love money above anything else

Michael Lewis has a fascinating review of a new biography of Warren Buffett, The Master of Money, by Alice Schroeder. Buffett apparently had dinner at Akio Morita’s house and did not eat any of the food.

He avoids social conflict, unless there is money on the line, and also all sorts of new experiences. His long-time partner Charlie Munger likes to call Buffett a “learning machine,” but there are whole swaths of human activity he actively resists learning anything at all about, such as the entire high-tech industry. He confines himself to the diet of an eight-year-old, refusing to eat anything much beyond spaghetti, hamburgers, and grilled cheese sandwiches. [Warren Buffett biographer Alice] Schroeder describes a bizarre scene in which Katherine Graham escorted Buffett to dinner at the Manhattan apartment of Sony Chairman Akio Morita. Japanese chefs served plate after plate that Buffett left completely untouched. “By the end of fifteen courses, he still had not eaten a bite,” writes Schroeder. “The Moritas could not have been more polite, which added to his humiliation. He was desperate to escape back to Kay’s apartment, where popcorn and peanuts and strawberry ice cream awaited him. ‘It was the worst,’ he says about the meal he did not eat. ‘I’ve had others like it but it was by far the worst. I will never eat Japanese food again.’” Buffett ate what he needed to eat to remain alive–and learned what he needed to learn to invest shrewdly.

Clearly, I’ll never be a billionaire because I don’t care about money in the single-minded way Buffett does.

Frankly, I don’t think a billion dollars would be enough to force me into a diet of only spaghetti, hamburgers and grilled cheese sandwiches.

via Curzon at Mutantfrog Travelogue

Categories
Food

Things to avoid when eating in restaurants

An old article from 2000 but I had not seen it before.
Things to avoid when eating in restaurants

Categories
Food Japan

Italian farmers pin beef hopes on Japanese cows – Yahoo! News

Having spent a decent amount of time enjoying the cuisine of both Italy and Japan, this is good news!

A farm near Milan is raising Japanese Wagyu cows to woo meat-loving Italians with the world’s most expensive Kobe steaks.
The Italians are hoping the tender, marbled beef will revive falling beef consumption and give their profits a boost.
Described by one chef as “the Ferrari of meat,” Kobe has been making inroads in Italy even though it costs about 100 euros ($148.2) per kg to buy. That’s twice the price of Italy’s Fiorentina T-bone steaks from Chianina cows.

Italian farmers pin beef hopes on Japanese cows – Yahoo! News

Categories
Food Japan

Michelin Guide Tokyo list

I have only thumbed through a friend’s copy of the recently released (and now sold out) Michelin Guide Tokyo. I have only been to a handful of the restaurants in the guide (maybe 5-7 of the 1 stars.) It is staggering to think that while Paris and New York City have roughly 20,000 restaurants, the greater Tokyo area has over 160,000 restaurants.

There’s a longer discussion about what really deserves stars and why it took a non-Japanese company to create the most-recognizable guide to food in Tokyo, and how many of the best restaurants are invite-only and thus are not reviewed, but that’s for another day.

The full list of Michelin Guide Tokyo restaurants are on the Michelin website (name only- buy the guidebook for the reviews once they reprint it.)

Categories
Food Japan

Ivan Ramen

The WSJ has a nice profile of chef Ivan Orkin, [Trying to Out-Noodle the Japanese – WSJ.com ]who has opened a ramen restaurant, Ivan Ramen, in Setagaya. I hope to make it over there and try a bowl.