assumptions on suicide

Trans-Pacific Radio has a great podcast/post on the mistaken assumptions of suicide in Japan. I really enjoyed it and look forward to future podcasts from TPR.

Trans-Pacific Radio TPR Spotlight #1: Suicide by the Numbers

5 comments on “assumptions on suicide
  1. Bruno-Ken says:

    Excellent article. Thanks for posting about it. I have been curious about this issue, and wondered just how Japan compared with other countries, especially developed countries, setting aside the mediatization and hype.
    Other issues that would be worth looking at in a similar way would be bullying in school (“ijime”), the so-called “hikikomori” phenomenon, and young (and not so young) adults staying at home living jobless with their parents. Not to mention NEETs, freetahs, etc. I would not be surprised if Japan turned out to be not as unusual in these phenomena as both the Japanese and international media often make it out to be.

  2. Garrett says:

    Thanks, Bruno-Ken, both for the kind words and the ideas. I especially like the hikikomori idea as that’s something I and, I think, most people, associate exclusively with Japan. It’ll be tough to research, though. Statistically, suicide is a rather cut and dry thing to research.
    I’d imagine NEET, freeters, and adults living with their folks would be a lot higher in Japan than North America, but similar to Italy or Latin America.
    As for bullying, I want to know about Japan compared to itself – how big has the increase in bullying been, if there’s been one at all? Is bullying increasing or just getting more attention?

  3. fukumimi says:

    I left a comment at TPR’s blog, but FYI the suicide rates (and the trends thereof) published by the Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare show significantly higher numbers (I’ve postulated about some reasons why that may be in the comment).
    The statistics are here:
    http://www.mhlw.go.jp/toukei/saikin/hw/jinkou/tokusyu/suicide04/

  4. Bruno-Ken says:

    –> I’d imagine NEET, freeters, and adults living with their folks would be a lot higher in Japan than North America, but similar to Italy or Latin America.
    Garrett, re: North America, that was my impression, too. But then I caught this:
    http://www.onpointradio.org/shows/2006/04/20060404_b_main.asp

  5. Bruno-Ken says:

    Not sure if my last comment took, but Garrett, I also assumed that there would be more hikikomori in Japan than in North America. But then I listened to this eyebrow-raising radio program:
    http://www.onpointradio.org/shows/2006/04/20060404_b_main.asp